Barix Cisco Live streaming applications
icon4 10 12th, 2012| icon3Comments Off

One little known feature of the Barix INSTREAMER is it’s built in support for live streaming in a Cisco environment – easy to overlook in such a feature packed device!
Nonetheless, word is getting back to us more and more frequently of customers using the functionality, primarily in one of two configurations:

- as a ‘Live Stream’ where users can dial an extension and hear the Instreamer audio; a dealer room is one example of where this can be useful, the Instreamer is streaming a live feed of market data.

- to stream live audio for music on hold; for example a local radio station (make sure that you have the rights / have paid the royalty fees before rebroadcasting any radio channel!). A great customer story here: http://www.netcraftsmen.net/resources/blogs/live-stream-music-on-hold-and-cisco-uc-on-ucs-barix.html

This second option is distinct from ‘traditional’ Music/Messaging on Hold supported by the Exstreamer MOH Client firmware, where a fixed file is played repeatedly to callers on hold. More here: http://www.moh-technology.com/news/161/

All,

as you  might have heard in the past, Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremen (awi) has been using Barix products (namely, Barionet and Instreamer) in a science mission (PALAOA) in antarctica since quite some years now. The Barionets are used for general control and power management, while the Instreamer is used to realtime encode audio from Hydrophones and stream to Neumeyerstation located in Antarctica as well.

There is a very nice, detailed paper available from the PALAOA website (link: here), explaining details and difficulties of the whole setup.

Here is another link to the story, this time in german, with more the scientific view, sound samples etc: PALAOA.

And here is a direct link to the live stream from Antarctica, encoded by a Barix Instreamer: http://icecast.awi.de:8000/PALAOA.MP3

One thing to notice .. Barionet and Instreamer, both standard “consumer temp range” Barix products, work flawlessly since years in the setup in Antarctica, being operated sometimes at -50′C, constantly (24/7) delivering control and monitoring of the station and an IP Audio feed of the hydrophone(s).

What works that reliably in this remote location under extreme conditions should do well for you too, ain’t it ?

Johannes